Lenny Kundel aka Stamford Dentist

tastefullyoffensive:

[codekb]

unexplained-events:

Top picture: 1987 Dr. Zbigniew Religa monitors his patient’s vitals after a 23 hour long heart transplant surgery. His assistant is asleep in the corner. Photograph taken by James Stanfield.

Bottom picture: His patient who survived and actually went on to outlive Dr. Religa.

Dr. Religa was also the first surgeon to graft an artificial valve using materials from human corpses. He lead a team that completed the first successful heart transplantation in Poland. Him and his team obtained the Brusseis Eureka award for developing an implantable pump for a pneumatic heart assistance system.

(via unexplained-events)

newyorker:

A cartoon from this week’s issue by Zachary Kanin. View more cartoons from the magazine.

It only seems fair

newyorker:

A cartoon from this week’s issue by Zachary Kanin. View more cartoons from the magazine.

It only seems fair

tastefullyoffensive:

[chienlou]

Can’t make this up

tastefullyoffensive:

[chienlou]

Can’t make this up

climateadaptation:

You’ve all seen Emma Watson’s killer speech on feminism and equality at the UN Women 2014 Conference, riiiiight?

Very good indeed

(via emergentfutures)

explore-blog:

Researchers develop the formula for happiness. No, really. For the algebraically reluctant, it boils down to this:

Happiness “doesn’t depend on how things are going [but] on whether things are going better or worse than you had expected they would.”

Albert Camus put it even more elegantly half a century ago, and Kierkegaard touched on it in his meditation on the greatest source of our unhappiness.
Dive deeper with these 7 essential reads on the psychology of happiness.

Happiness “doesn’t depend on how things are going [but] on whether things are going better or worse than you had expected they would.”

explore-blog:

Researchers develop the formula for happiness. No, really. For the algebraically reluctant, it boils down to this:

Happiness “doesn’t depend on how things are going [but] on whether things are going better or worse than you had expected they would.”

Albert Camus put it even more elegantly half a century ago, and Kierkegaard touched on it in his meditation on the greatest source of our unhappiness.

Dive deeper with these 7 essential reads on the psychology of happiness.

Happiness “doesn’t depend on how things are going [but] on whether things are going better or worse than you had expected they would.”

did-you-kno:

Source

Billy Joel's Incredibly Convincing Argument Against Ivory Piano Keys

wildeles:

Billy Joel:

I wholeheartedly support the ivory sales ban bill pending in New York State. I am a piano player. And I realize that ivory piano keys are preferred by some pianists. But a preference for ivory keys does not justify the slaughter of 96 elephants every day. There are other materials which can be substituted for piano keys. But magnificent creatures like these can never be replaced. Music must never be used as an excuse to destroy an endangered species. Music should be a celebration of life - not an instrument of death.

(via funnywildlife)

tastefullyoffensive:

Airplane Sleeping Positions [via]

Oi

“Best career advice I ever heard was, ‘Don’t expect to be paid more for what you do if you’re not willing to do more than what you’re paid for’.”

—   (via cynicallyjaded)

(Source: distilled-wisdom, via forbes)

emergentfutures:

Sleep’s memory role discovered



The team in China and the US used advanced microscopy to witness new connections between brain cells - synapses - forming during sleep.
Their study, published in the journal Science, showed even intense training could not make up for lost sleep.
Experts said it was an elegant and significant study, which uncovered the mechanisms of memory.
It is well known that sleep plays an important role in memory and learning. But what actually happens inside the brain has been a source of considerable debate.
Researchers at New York University School of Medicine and Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School trained mice in a new skill - walking on top of a rotating rod.
They then looked inside the living brain with a microscope to see what happened when the animals were either sleeping or sleep deprived.
Their study showed that sleeping mice formed significantly more new connections between neurons - they were learning more


Full Story : BBC

emergentfutures:

Sleep’s memory role discovered

The team in China and the US used advanced microscopy to witness new connections between brain cells - synapses - forming during sleep.

Their study, published in the journal Science, showed even intense training could not make up for lost sleep.

Experts said it was an elegant and significant study, which uncovered the mechanisms of memory.

It is well known that sleep plays an important role in memory and learning. But what actually happens inside the brain has been a source of considerable debate.

Researchers at New York University School of Medicine and Peking University Shenzhen Graduate School trained mice in a new skill - walking on top of a rotating rod.

They then looked inside the living brain with a microscope to see what happened when the animals were either sleeping or sleep deprived.

Their study showed that sleeping mice formed significantly more new connections between neurons - they were learning more

Full Story : BBC